A Message to Women – BEWARE of HR hiring practices and how you might be affected

At some point in time in most women’s career, they must carefully prepare for the dreaded interviewing process. However what some women do not realize is that based on how they respond to certain interview questions, they may disqualify themselves and leave the job open for the next woman or male.

According to Business Insider’s “I’ve-worked-in-hr-for-15-years-here-are-the-4-things-hiring-managers-dont-want-you-to-know”, many Human Resource (HR) representatives find deceptive ways to determine how committed a potential employee will be to their company.

It is possible the hiring manager may ask about plans that you have for the weekend to learn more about your family or childcare commitments. Why, you may ask?  Because most employers who are afraid of breaking sexual discrimination laws, will not ask up front if you have children.  However, they may have a strong desire to be in the know, as a way to avoid such things as maternity leave, a sick child (causing you to miss a day at work), Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) or parent/teacher conferences. Is it fair?  Absolutely not, yet it is done more often than you think.  Beware of such questions, it is designed to travel past the boundaries of information shared and set by you to learn how devoted you are to family (and not work).

Monitor Social Media

Facebook has a way of unveiling the most “colorful display” of an individual’s true character. The masks are off, leaving the bare essentials, revealing what hiring managers really want to know about you.

Do you live it up and like to party after work or on the weekends? Are you a huge supporter of family and kids? Do you place office rants on your page?  Anything to disqualify you can be found on social media.

This is more common knowledge these days, yet I see people posting things under their name on Facebook that should be avoided at all cost.

Not only should you pay close attention to what you post, you should pay close attention to what your friends post.  Simply tagging you into the photo that they took of you during your wild night out, can be enough to send the wrong idea to a potential or current employer. LinkedIn is becoming just as bad.  I knew I had to think twice who I networked with, when one of my previous coworkers had a picture posted that in my eyes was only deemed necessary for Facebook.

Change your social media name

Changing privacy settings or even changing your Facebook name may benefit you more than leaving your information out there for the world to see.

Even if you think you are secure in your job and you’re not actively looking for a job, you never know when the markets may change and you could potentially find yourself in the unemployment line. Therefore always remain vigilant and comprehend as some say, there is only “six degrees of separation”.

 

Advertisements

Author: theimperfectorg

“Joi Su”, has been diligently working to help bridge the gap between what people expect in any organization and what they receive. Joi Su has earned a Master’s degree in Organization Development and a Bachelors in Psychology with an emphasis on Applied Behavioral Analysis.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s