“Using interviewing tips to get the job can be the downfall to the employee as well as the organization.”

Do job interviews raise your anxiety levels?

Do you polish your apparel and try to recall all the interviewing tips that you learned so that you can appear confident?

In the past, you might have been successful with this feat. Other times you may have walked out the interview knowing you were ripped to shreds as soon as you exited the room.

Next time around when a potential job is at stake, and if your livelihood depends on it, it may be a clever idea to follow the interviewing tips and convey that air of confidence. No doubt you may be successful at landing the job.  However keep in mind that if you mimicked interviewing tips, you might find yourself hired because of your acting abilities, and not because you were the most qualified for the job.

You got the job! Yay!

Firm handshakes, direct eye contact, smiling, no fidgeting, sitting up straight, answering the questions in a way that is acceptable to the interviewer, may carry out its intended motive. Yay! You got the job!

For organizations, this is important. Every day a role is unfilled costs a company money. So it is not surprising that they would like to hire and fill those roles, as quickly as possible. But, can you say unequivocally, you were the most qualified for that job or did you just pull off the best acting job of your life?

Or, did that organization reduce the reputation of their brand, by hiring someone who will be damaging to it?  Hiring according to an image a person portrays, is not an indicator that they will be successful on the job.

 

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Image source

Sociopaths in the workplace

Many organizations are accepting of various “interviewing tips.” Business articles reference emulating professional behavior, almost to the point (in my opinion) of wearing a mask. However, there is a caveat to such tips; interviewing tips at times become a ploy to the interviewee. Therefore the hiring manager must be prepared to peel back the layers of deceit (if there is any).

Training individuals on how to interview until it is clear that you have located an individual who embodies the competencies and skill set necessary for that particular job, may be the better route to go.

Sure, it may be more time consuming and require additional resources, but in the end, you would have “built your organization on a strong foundation”, not sand.

Also, with all the talk of sociopaths in the workplace, hiring managers may want to think about learning how to read actions, word choices, and behavior, as accurately as possible.

Deception is difficult to identify when the interviewee is wearing a mask. Therefore, in my opinion, these interviewing tips should be disclosed to the public with caution (to cut down on those who strive through deceit).

The Aftermath

Deceptive behavior does not stop at the interviewee.  If the hiring manager is “playing a part,” the interviewee may incorrectly believe this organization is a good match for them.  When in reality, they may be “selling their soul to the devil.”

The aftermath of hiring under false pretenses can not only bring stress to that employee, but that stress can and almost always does, trickle down to all who interact with that employee, poisoning the work environment.

Still not convinced it’s a bad idea?

One more thing that I have witnessed are employees that ask themselves a few months into the job, why in the hell they accepted that job in the first place. Organization’s culture are impacted majorly increasing turn-over rates.

Organizations have the opportunity to vet employees properlyand not just buy into an act, when individuals are able to “be” themselves.

Am I missing something here or do you feel the same? It is preferable that a person comes into the interviewing room being their authentic selves than acting a part. Consequently, the interviewer and interviewee can determine if this will be a viable relationship.  Hiring prematurely or going by the act a person portrays on the outside no doubt can result in the organization doing more damage to their brand.

Many may not agree with me, and that is totally okay, but I if were looking to hire a competent employee I would prefer for someone to be honest, as opposed to playing a part. What do you think?

Reference:

Elliott, M. (2017). “10 Body Language Mistakes to Avoid in a Job Interview”. Psychology Today.  Retrieved from http://www.cheatsheet.com/money-career/body-language-mistakes-to-avoid-in-a-job-interview.html/

(2013, September 29). “Are You Working With A Sociopath? 4 Signs That Your Co-worker Could Have an Antisocial Personality Disorder”. Retrieved from https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/digital-leaders/201309/are-you-working-sociopath

 

 

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Author: theimperfectorg

“Joi Su”, has been diligently working to help bridge the gap between what people expect in any organization and what they receive. Joi Su has earned a Master’s degree in Organization Development and a Bachelors in Psychology with an emphasis on Applied Behavioral Analysis.

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