The “Red Pill” of Cultural Change: Organizational Culture Assessment Instrument (OCAI)

The “Red Pill” of Cultural Change: Organizational Culture Assessment Instrument (OCAI)

Are you seeking to understand why workers and management are not on the same page? Does your manager demand that you produce more work than you believe can be completed in a day? Do you have a micromanager who is quick to point out your errors and/or lack of efficiency? How about that rowdy boisterous team, are they overly engaging and collaborative to the level that it is making you uncomfortable? Are your unique ideas unappreciated or underutilized?

If you answered yes to any of those questions, you are in no way alone.  For years, many have battled to understand why management “just did not get it.” No doubt, some managers have the same sentiment as their employees.

If you would like to learn more about your culture and may be ready to consider change, I recommend the “Organizational Culture Assessment Instrument” (OCAI) – OCAI-Assessment. Like the “red pill” in the 199o movie, The Matrix, the OCAI can help you find the “truth of reality” in your organization, and knowledge is the first step toward enacting change.

According to authors Cameron and Quinn (2011) people are unaware of their culture until it is challenged until they have experienced a new culture, or until it is made overt and explicit. Their research has also found that organizational culture can impact individuals in many ways including morale, commitment, productivity, physical health, and emotional well-being. The OCAI can help you determine your organization’s culture and begin the process of addressing cultural change.

Is your organization considered a “Clan, Hierarchy, Adhocracy, or Marketing” culture?

Most organizations have developed a dominant culture style. An organization rarely has only one type. Often, there is a mix of the four organizational cultures that are described in the Figure below: Clan, Advocacy, Hierarchy, or Marketing (OCAI online, 2017).

Competing Value Framework with link in picture

Clan (Collaborate) –

Clan cultures are collaborative, family oriented environments that have a significant amount of interaction between the employees and management. Management is a part of the building and mentoring process for the team (Cameron and Quinn, 2011). Loyalty, tradition, and commitment are highly regarded, leaders assume parental roles, and this warmth trickles down to its internal/external customers (Cameron and Quinn, 2011).

 Hierarchy (Control) –

In a Hierarchy culture, you have a controlled, formalized, structured environment where policies and procedures are established, and protocol and boundaries are set (Cameron and Quinn, 2011).  Implemented for uniformity and control, those who run such organizational cultures are more concerned with pushing out consistent, efficient productivity to remain a step ahead of its competitors (Cameron and Quinn, 2011).

BlogspotInternal-External FocusAdhocracy (Create) –

The Adhocracy culture values the “creativity “that employees produce and foster in the workplace. Innovation and commitment are regarded over loyalty, tradition, and family. Success is governed by the new opportunities that creativity can render, for example, new innovative products such as the iPad. Without restrictions, employees are given the freedom to create.

Market (Compete) –

The Market culture is an aggressive, competing, results-driven culture.  Leaders drive employees to increase profitability and meet company objectives (Cameron and Quinn, 2011). These organizational cultures are very intense. The bottom line is to compete for results that establish and maintain a brand amongst its competitors while also increasing the organization’s market share.

Knowing your organization’s current dominant culture, as well as what is preferred by you and your fellow employees, creates an opportunity for the organization to retain quality people, increase profitability, generate innovative products while unifying and presenting consistent and quality branding. The OCAI assessment is a wonderful tool that can identify where you and your organization’s expectations lie and it can help further the discussion on how to bridge the gap between the two.

Questions for Discussion:

  1. How would you characterize the culture of your organization? Is it a Clan, Advocacy, Hierarchy, or Marketing culture?
  2. How effective is your organization’s culture? How might a different culture be more effective?

Reference:

Cameron, K.S., & Quinn, R.E. (2011). Diagnosing and changing organizational culture: Based on the competing values framework (3rd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Giritli, H., Oney-Yazici, E. Gulfer T., Emarah Acar. (2013). The interplay between leadership and organizational culture in the Turkish construction sector.  International Journal of Project Management, 31, 228-238.  Retrieved from https://www.researchgate.net/figure/257094681_fig1_Fig-1-The-Competing-Values-Framework-Cameron-and-Quinn-1999

OCAI – Online. (2017, January 22).  OCAI Assessment. Retrieved from https://www.ocai-online.com/about-the-Organizational-Culture-Assessment-Instrument-OCAI/OCAI-Assessment

OCAI – Online. (2017, January 22).  Organizational Culture Types. Retrieved from https://www.ocai-online.com/about-the-Organizational-Culture-Assessment-Instrument-OCAI/Organizational-Culture-Types

Useful in Parts. (2013, May 15).  5steps in considering culture and business process improvement. Retrieved from http://usefulinparts.blogspot.com/2013/05/5steps-in-considering-culture-and.html

Advertisements

Author: theimperfectorg

“Joi Su”, has been diligently working to help bridge the gap between what people expect in any organization and what they receive. Joi Su has earned a Master’s degree in Organization Development and a Bachelors in Psychology with an emphasis on Applied Behavioral Analysis.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s