Happy Veterans Day from The Imperfect Org!

Happy Veteran’s Day everyone from the Imperfect Org! Since its official start in 1938 Veterans Day originally started as Armistice Day in 1919, but the US Government decided to recognize those who fought for this country’s freedoms on an annual basis. Precise ceremonies and parades are held on Veteran’s day the government posted more information here on their Department of Veterans Affairs here:

 

Even though the federal government as we know it is one of the most dysfunction organizations on the planet this is actually something it does right. In Organizational development we always say an organization should celebrate and recognize those who work for it and sacrificed time from their families for that organization. Here on a grander scale, our veterans have done the same and even more so having a day set aside to celebrate their courage, sacrifice and service from an Organizational Development standpoint is not only right but a clear positive model for what we should be doing on a daily basis in other organizations.

 

We are thankful for their sacrifices because of the freedoms it provides but I know like most of you besides honoring our veterans there is little else that we know about it. The history channel has a website for more details regarding the holiday with more videos and information about celebrations through its history.

 

We at The Imperfect Org wish all of our soldiers the best this Veteran’s Day and thank them for the service!

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Happy Yom Kippur! -The Imperfect Org!

To increase one’s individual and organizational understanding of different cultures we have in this blog posted a link to information regarding Yom Kippur. This is an important holiday in the Jewish religion and to employees in your organization of the Jewish faith may have observations and cultural mores that will need attending to!

Therefore to not only recognize these employees of the Jewish faith which in turn increases Organizational morale but also the knowledge of the other stakeholders in the organization to the practices of the coworkers. Not only for HR reasons, but also to make sure the individuals feel a part of the organization’s community at large.

Please check out this information on history.com about Yom Kippur!

http://www.history.com/topics/holidays/yom-kippur-history

The “Red Pill” of Cultural Change: Organizational Culture Assessment Instrument (OCAI)

The “Red Pill” of Cultural Change: Organizational Culture Assessment Instrument (OCAI)

Are you seeking to understand why workers and management are not on the same page? Does your manager demand that you produce more work than you believe can be completed in a day? Do you have a micromanager who is quick to point out your errors and/or lack of efficiency? How about that rowdy boisterous team, are they overly engaging and collaborative to the level that it is making you uncomfortable? Are your unique ideas unappreciated or underutilized?

If you answered yes to any of those questions, you are in no way alone.  For years, many have battled to understand why management “just did not get it.” No doubt, some managers have the same sentiment as their employees.

If you would like to learn more about your culture and may be ready to consider change, I recommend the “Organizational Culture Assessment Instrument” (OCAI) – OCAI-Assessment. Like the “red pill” in the 199o movie, The Matrix, the OCAI can help you find the “truth of reality” in your organization, and knowledge is the first step toward enacting change.

According to authors Cameron and Quinn (2011) people are unaware of their culture until it is challenged until they have experienced a new culture, or until it is made overt and explicit. Their research has also found that organizational culture can impact individuals in many ways including morale, commitment, productivity, physical health, and emotional well-being. The OCAI can help you determine your organization’s culture and begin the process of addressing cultural change.

Is your organization considered a “Clan, Hierarchy, Adhocracy, or Marketing” culture?

Most organizations have developed a dominant culture style. An organization rarely has only one type. Often, there is a mix of the four organizational cultures that are described in the Figure below: Clan, Advocacy, Hierarchy, or Marketing (OCAI online, 2017).

Competing Value Framework with link in picture

Clan (Collaborate) –

Clan cultures are collaborative, family oriented environments that have a significant amount of interaction between the employees and management. Management is a part of the building and mentoring process for the team (Cameron and Quinn, 2011). Loyalty, tradition, and commitment are highly regarded, leaders assume parental roles, and this warmth trickles down to its internal/external customers (Cameron and Quinn, 2011).

 Hierarchy (Control) –

In a Hierarchy culture, you have a controlled, formalized, structured environment where policies and procedures are established, and protocol and boundaries are set (Cameron and Quinn, 2011).  Implemented for uniformity and control, those who run such organizational cultures are more concerned with pushing out consistent, efficient productivity to remain a step ahead of its competitors (Cameron and Quinn, 2011).

BlogspotInternal-External FocusAdhocracy (Create) –

The Adhocracy culture values the “creativity “that employees produce and foster in the workplace. Innovation and commitment are regarded over loyalty, tradition, and family. Success is governed by the new opportunities that creativity can render, for example, new innovative products such as the iPad. Without restrictions, employees are given the freedom to create.

Market (Compete) –

The Market culture is an aggressive, competing, results-driven culture.  Leaders drive employees to increase profitability and meet company objectives (Cameron and Quinn, 2011). These organizational cultures are very intense. The bottom line is to compete for results that establish and maintain a brand amongst its competitors while also increasing the organization’s market share.

Knowing your organization’s current dominant culture, as well as what is preferred by you and your fellow employees, creates an opportunity for the organization to retain quality people, increase profitability, generate innovative products while unifying and presenting consistent and quality branding. The OCAI assessment is a wonderful tool that can identify where you and your organization’s expectations lie and it can help further the discussion on how to bridge the gap between the two.

Questions for Discussion:

  1. How would you characterize the culture of your organization? Is it a Clan, Advocacy, Hierarchy, or Marketing culture?
  2. How effective is your organization’s culture? How might a different culture be more effective?

Reference:

Cameron, K.S., & Quinn, R.E. (2011). Diagnosing and changing organizational culture: Based on the competing values framework (3rd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Giritli, H., Oney-Yazici, E. Gulfer T., Emarah Acar. (2013). The interplay between leadership and organizational culture in the Turkish construction sector.  International Journal of Project Management, 31, 228-238.  Retrieved from https://www.researchgate.net/figure/257094681_fig1_Fig-1-The-Competing-Values-Framework-Cameron-and-Quinn-1999

OCAI – Online. (2017, January 22).  OCAI Assessment. Retrieved from https://www.ocai-online.com/about-the-Organizational-Culture-Assessment-Instrument-OCAI/OCAI-Assessment

OCAI – Online. (2017, January 22).  Organizational Culture Types. Retrieved from https://www.ocai-online.com/about-the-Organizational-Culture-Assessment-Instrument-OCAI/Organizational-Culture-Types

Useful in Parts. (2013, May 15).  5steps in considering culture and business process improvement. Retrieved from http://usefulinparts.blogspot.com/2013/05/5steps-in-considering-culture-and.html

A Message to Women – BEWARE of HR hiring practices and how you might be affected

At some point in time in most women’s career, they must carefully prepare for the dreaded interviewing process. However what some women do not realize is that based on how they respond to certain interview questions, they may disqualify themselves and leave the job open for the next woman or male.

According to Business Insider’s “I’ve-worked-in-hr-for-15-years-here-are-the-4-things-hiring-managers-dont-want-you-to-know”, many Human Resource (HR) representatives find deceptive ways to determine how committed a potential employee will be to their company.

It is possible the hiring manager may ask about plans that you have for the weekend to learn more about your family or childcare commitments. Why, you may ask?  Because most employers who are afraid of breaking sexual discrimination laws, will not ask up front if you have children.  However, they may have a strong desire to be in the know, as a way to avoid such things as maternity leave, a sick child (causing you to miss a day at work), Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) or parent/teacher conferences. Is it fair?  Absolutely not, yet it is done more often than you think.  Beware of such questions, it is designed to travel past the boundaries of information shared and set by you to learn how devoted you are to family (and not work).

Monitor Social Media

Facebook has a way of unveiling the most “colorful display” of an individual’s true character. The masks are off, leaving the bare essentials, revealing what hiring managers really want to know about you.

Do you live it up and like to party after work or on the weekends? Are you a huge supporter of family and kids? Do you place office rants on your page?  Anything to disqualify you can be found on social media.

This is more common knowledge these days, yet I see people posting things under their name on Facebook that should be avoided at all cost.

Not only should you pay close attention to what you post, you should pay close attention to what your friends post.  Simply tagging you into the photo that they took of you during your wild night out, can be enough to send the wrong idea to a potential or current employer. LinkedIn is becoming just as bad.  I knew I had to think twice who I networked with, when one of my previous coworkers had a picture posted that in my eyes was only deemed necessary for Facebook.

Change your social media name

Changing privacy settings or even changing your Facebook name may benefit you more than leaving your information out there for the world to see.

Even if you think you are secure in your job and you’re not actively looking for a job, you never know when the markets may change and you could potentially find yourself in the unemployment line. Therefore always remain vigilant and comprehend as some say, there is only “six degrees of separation”.

 

Using baby steps to implement Cultural Change Efforts

Have you been involved in an organizational culture change, only to see your organization pick up the bad habits just as quickly as they vowed to destroy them?

In large organizations, cultural change is not something as easily undertaken as the conversation about it unveils.

Frustration faces many of us as we encounter how things are done versus how things should play out.

“Culture defines core values, assumptions, interpretations, and approaches that characterize an organization” (Cameron and Quinn, 2011, p. 35).

According to an article on OCAI’s website, Conditions-for-Successful-Organizational-Change many organization consultants are faced with the challenge of developing a cultural change model for an organization, just to see it quickly buried.  Why? Because of the hard work that revolves around getting people on the same page for one, getting them committed (for two), and three, keeping them committed.  Since we do not have control over another person’s will, this can be a daunting task. That, in a nutshell, is enough to rattle any involved in the change efforts, nerves.  Therefore before you say that you want a change in your company culture, beware that not only does it not come easy, it can come at the price, of stress and frustration.

Small Victories go a long way

One of the main things that can be adopted, according to “Diagnosing and changing organizational culture” (Cameron and Quinn, 2011), is “celebrating small” victories, no matter how small that victory may be. In fact setting certain benchmarks for those small victories can help maintain the change model instituted. Building and keeping momentum, are critical to the success of change efforts.

Employees have the opportunity to see that “yes, this cultural change can actually happen”, or “there is progress being made!”  Nothing excites an employee more than seeing that in which upper management has instituted come to pass.  Trust and reliability is established as they begin to see the change effort is not just another fad, you’re your CEO may have read about and decided to implement.  Therefore I urge you to implement celebrating small victories.  The moment doubt enters and spreads through your organization is the very moment your change efforts has just tanked.

Cameron, K.S., & Quinn, R.E. (2011). Diagnosing and changing organizational culture: Based on the competing values framework (3rd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

 

“Lead your staff to a new organizational culture!” -The Imperfect Org

In this article “Lead your staff to a new organizational culture!” by Marcella Bremer talks about managers acting as leaders in an organizational culture, and turning into transitioning into three different roles as a manager:

  1. Mentor
  2. Facilitator
  3. People-oriented leaders

The article lists various strategies for the manager to follow to become the type of leader that an organization’s employees need. The article also briefly discusses the use of the Clan Culture concept and focus upon the employees by the manager.

How to manage conflict, bridge performance gaps effectively and engaging employees are significant challenges that managers face but creating culture change is even more of a challenge. This article will give the reader, the manager, a starting point to begin this arduous and tasking process.

For more information regarding this topic just click on the link:

http://www.ocai-online.com/blog/2011/04/Lead-Your-Staff-To-A-New-Organizational-Culture